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Philips GC1115 Steam Iron

 
Warranty Period:
2 Year Warranty
Power Consumption:
1200 W
Water Spray:
Yes
Iron Type:
Steam Iron
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Out of Stock
•  Free Shipping
•  100% Genuine Product
•  Cash on Delivery
•  10 days replacement
•  Delivery in 2-3 business days
46 Reviews from Zopper Customers
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Philips GC1115 Steam Iron
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Electric Iron
A clothing iron, also referred to as simply an iron, is a small appliance: a handheld piece of equipment with a flat, roughly triangular surface that, when heated, is used to press clothes to remove creases. It is named for the metal the device is commonly made of, and the use of it is generally called ironing. Ironing works by loosening the ties between the long chains of molecules that exist in polymer fiber materials. With the heat and the weight of the ironing plate, the fibers are stretched and the fabric maintains its new shape when cool. Some materials such as cotton require the use of water to loosen the intermolecular bonds. Many materials developed in the twentieth century are advertised as needing little or no ironing. The electric iron was invented in 1882 by Henry W. Seeley, a New York inventor. Seeley patented his "electric flatiron" on June 6, 1882 (patent no. 259,054). His iron weighed almost 15 pounds and took a long time to warm up. Other electric irons had also been invented, including one from France (1882), but it used a carbon arc to heat the iron, a method which was dangerous.[citation needed] Features Modern irons for home use can have the following features: A design that allows the iron to be set down, usually standing on its end, without the hot soleplate touching anything that could be damaged; A thermostat ensuring maintenance of a constant temperature; A temperature control dial allowing the user to select the operating temperatures (usually marked with types of cloth rather than temperatures: "silk", "wool", "cotton", "linen", etc.); An electrical cord with heat-resistant Teflon (PTFE) insulation; Ejection of steam through the clothing during the ironing process; A water reservoir inside the iron used for steam generation; An indicator showing the amount of water left in the reservoir, Constant steam - constantly sends steam through the hot part of the iron into the clothes; Steam burst - sends a burst of steam through the clothes when the user presses a button; (advanced feature) Dial controlling the amount of steam to emit as a constant stream; (advanced feature) Anti-drip system; Cord control - the point at which the cord attaches to the iron has a spring to hold the cord out of the way while ironing and likewise when setting down the iron (prevents fires, is more convenient, etc.); (advanced feature) non-stick coating along the soleplate to help the iron glide across the fabric (advanced feature) Anti-burn control - if the iron is left flat (possibly touching clothes) for too long, the iron shuts off to prevent scorching and fires; (advanced feature) Energy saving control - if the iron is left undisturbed for several (10 or 15) minutes, the iron shuts off to save energy and prevent fires. Cordless irons - the iron is placed on a stand for a short period to warm up, using thermal mass to stay hot for a short period. These are useful for light loads only. Battery power is not viable for irons as they require more power than practical batteries can provide. (advanced feature) 3-way auto shut-off (advanced feature) self-cleaning Few of the Iron Box brands are Orpat, Philips, Russell Hobbs, Morphy Richards, Crompton Greaves, Bajaj, Panasonic, Usha, Kenstar, Inalsa, Glen, Maharaja Whiteline, Westinghouse, Oster, Khaitan, Black & Decker, Sunflame, Bajaj Platini, Wipro, Greenchef, Pigeon, Prestige, Jaipan, Preethi Metal pans filled with hot water were used for smoothing fabrics in China in the 1st century BC.[citation needed] From the 17th century, sadirons or sad irons (from an old word meaning solid) began to be used. They were thick slabs of cast iron, delta-shaped and with a handle, heated in a fire. These were also called flat irons. A later design consisted of an iron box which could be filled with hot coals, which had to be periodically aerated by attaching a bellows. In Kerala in India, burning coconut shells were used instead of charcoal, as they have a similar heating capacity. This method is still in use as a backup device since power outages are frequent. Other box irons had heated metal inserts instead of hot coals. Another solution was to employ a cluster of solid irons that were heated from the single source: as the iron currently in use cools down, it could be quickly replaced by another one that is hot. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, there were many irons in use which were heated by a fuel such as kerosene, ethanol, whale oil, natural gas, carbide gas (acetylene) as with carbide lamps, or even gasoline. Some houses were equipped with a system of pipes for distributing natural gas or carbide gas to different rooms in order to operate appliances such as irons, in addition to lights. Despite the risk of fire, liquid-fuel irons were sold in U.S. rural areas up through World War II. In the industrialized world, these designs have been superseded by the electric iron, which uses resistive heating from an electric current. The hot plate, called the sole plate, is made of aluminium or stainless steel. The heating element is controlled by a thermostat which switches the current on and off to maintain the selected temperature. The invention of the resistively heated electric iron is credited to Henry W. Seeley of New York in 1882. In the same year an iron heated by a carbon arc was introduced in France, but was too dangerous to be successful. The early electric irons had no easy way to control their temperature, and the first thermostatically controlled electric iron appeared in the 1920s. Later, steam was used to iron clothing. Credit for the invention of the steam iron goes to Thomas Sears. The first commercially available electric steam iron was introduced in 1926 by a New York drying and cleaning company, Eldec, but was not a commercial success. The $10 Steam-O-Matic of 1938 was the first steam iron to achieve any degree of popularity, and led the way to more widespread use of the electric steam iron during the 1940s and 50s.
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it's very good buy this
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E
A Cool Product for Fast and Powerful Ironing

Pros:

- Its fine spray evenly distributes the water and makes the fabric sufficiently moist. This electric iron will give a proper smoothness to your cloth.

- The plastic is good and this Philips Iron provides a 180 degree single sided swivel which helps in ironing clothes easily.

- Its Golden Coloured Heating Plate does not let the fabric stick to the surface. 

- The steam iron comes in two steaming modes- Regular and heavy, giving you choices to iron clothes as per your convenience. 
       
- There is a temperature-ready light which indicates as to when the set temperature is reached. 

- Its Calc Clean function removes scale particles out of the iron.

- The Button Groove helps in speeding up ironing along buttons and steams.
 
Cons:

- The water capacity is only 150 ml. You might want to use more water while ironing clothes.

- This Philips Dry iron makes you wait for like 30 seconds before it actually gets heated up.

- Its wire is not too long. 

Verdict:

This Philips Iron is sure to impress you with its smooth performance. It heats fast so you do not have to wait for your iron to get heated first. Its extra large soleplate gives you fast ironing. So if you are looking for an Iron for fast and quick ironing clothes, this is a must-have.

 

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S
no more wrinkled clothes!!
it is a must buy product.. as it has got everything required as it provides quality to the ironed clothes.. philips also serve with the amazing feature of temperature control according to the user's wish and type of cloth.. it also has water spray feature with water tank capacity of 150 ml. it has a frequency of 50-60 hz with power consumption of 1200 w.. it is compact in size so no problem occurs in handling of iron and anyone can control it.. the cord in it is durable and it is also very effective in removing the wrinkles.. it is easily portable and gives very smooth and uniform ironing to the cloth.. it is very convenient to use and has self-clean calc management system. it is completely a reliable product..
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Product Details
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Get crisp and crease-free clothes with the Philips iron that is designed for effortless ironing. It comes with three steam settings with durable, highly scratch-resistant Dupont Dynaglide soleplate. This Philips iron has integrated Calc- Clean and spray function. Its spraying technology moistens the fabric evenly. Its base comprises of a thin Golden American Heritage soleplate that makes it highly scratch-resistant and durable. It comes with 1200 W Consumption and two years warranty. It also includes Temperature Control, Self Cleaning Feature and Variable Steam Control. It has 180 degree swivel. Its voltage is 220-240 V and frequency is 50-60 Hz. The water tank capacity is 150 ml which comes with a maximum marking level.

Warranty
Warranty Period
2 Year Warranty
Power
Power Input
220 V
Frequency
50-60 Hz
Power Consumption
1200 W
Package
Items in the box
Iron, User Manual, Warranty Card
General
Sole Plate
Golden American Heritage
Water Spray
Yes
Water Tank Capacity
150 ml
Iron Type
Steam Iron
Temperature Control
Yes
Swivel Cord
180°
Steam Burst/Control
Yes
Add on Features
Indicator Light
Yes
Self Cleaning Ability
Yes
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