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Nokia 5233 Black

 
SIM:
Single SIM, GSM
Size:
3.2 Inches
Primary Camera:
Yes, 2 Megapixel
Weight:
113 g
FM Player:
Yes
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Nokia 5233 Black
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Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G.Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G. Internet via a wireless network access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (65 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can comprise an area as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves or as large as many square miles — this is achieved by using multiple overlapping access points. "Wi-Fi" is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance and the brand name for products using the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" designation and trademark. Wi-Fi has had a checkered security history. Its earliest encryption system, WEP, proved easy to break. Much higher quality protocols, WPA and WPA2, were added later. However, an optional feature added in 2007, called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), has a flaw that allows a remote attacker to recover the router's WPA or WPA2 password in a few hours on most implementations.[2] Some manufacturers have recommended turning off the WPS feature. The Wi-Fi Alliance has since updated its test plan and certification program to ensure all newly certified devices resist brute-force AP PIN attacks. History Main article: History of IEEE 802.11 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission that released the ISM band for unlicensed use.[3] In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11 intended for use in cashier systems. The first wireless products were under the name WaveLAN. Vic Hayes has been called the "father of Wi-Fi" by some, due to his involvement in negotiating the initial standards within the IEEE while chairing the workgroup.[4][5] A large number of patents by many companies are used in 802.11 standard.[6] In 1992 and 1996, Australian organisation CSIRO obtained patents for a method later used in Wi-Fi to "unsmear" the signal.[7] In April 2009, 14 tech companies agreed to pay CSIRO $250 million for infringements on CSIRO patents.[8] This led to WiFi being attributed as an Australian invention,[9] though this has been the subject of some controversy.[10][11] CSIRO won a further $220 million settlement for Wi-Fi patent infringements in 2012 with global firms in the United States required to pay the CSIRO licensing rights estimated to be worth an additional $1 billion in royalties.[8][12][13] In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.[14] The name The term Wi-Fi, first used commercially in August 1999,[15] was coined by a brand-consulting firm called Interbrand Corporation. The Wi-Fi Alliance had hired Interbrand to determine a name that was "a little catchier than 'IEEE 802.11b Direct Sequence'".[16][17][18] Belanger also stated that Interbrand invented Wi-Fi as a play on words with Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and also created the Wi-Fi logo. The Wi-Fi Alliance initially used an advertising slogan for Wi-Fi, "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity",[16] but later removed the phrase from their marketing. Despite this, some documents from the Alliance dated 2003 and 2004 still contain the term Wireless Fidelity.[19][20] There was no official statement related to the dropping of the term. The yin-yang Wi-Fi logo indicates the certification of a product for interoperability.[19] Non-Wi-Fi technologies intended for fixed points such as Motorola Canopy are usually described as fixed wireless. Alternative wireless technologies include mobile phone standards such as 2G, 3G or 4G.
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nokiav5233
User All Reviews Write A Review see more+ By Sumit Posted on: 19 August 2012 Everything is conceptualized!! The phone gets good reception, the sound is good. the speaker phone works nice. It takes OK pictures, but it is very sensitive to motion and they come out blurry for me. The 16Gigabyte microSD is awesome. I can load all my MP3's on it, and listen for hours. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 2 out of 3 people found this review helpful) see more+ By SUPPORT NAAPTOL Posted on: 05 May 2012 AMIT NOKIA 5233 IS VERY GOOD MOBILE BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE FUNCTIONS AND GAMES AS COMPARED TO OTHERS OR MORE APPLICATIONS SUPPORTED BY THIS MOBILE.THERE ARE MORE Colour Options IN THIS MOBILE ..AND Nokia 5233 runs on Symbian S60v5 operating system and 434 MHz ARM processor. It comes with 2 megapixel camera and 3.2 inches TFT resistive touchscreen. it has 16GB expandable memory and supports GPRS/EGDE. Other feature includes a 3.5 mm audio jack, FM radio with RDS, A-GPS, audio and video player, Photo editor, Flash Lite 3.0, downloadable games, upto 7 hours talktime and OVI maps. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 17 out of 26 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Swapnil Sanagar Posted on: 27 April 2012 Nokia 5233 I have been using this model of Nokia since last 5 months and the touch screen of this handset is unbeatable. It has no comparison. Its gprs has good speed. the overall performance of this handset is awesome. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 11 out of 14 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Shyam Pandey Posted on: 19 April 2012 Nice Product I have updated my mobile software and got smily support. Excellent. Now I can send sms with emotions Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 52 people found this review helpful) see more+ By partha Posted on: 03 July 2011 NOKIA 5233 Very nice, durable and stylish phone and guess what its a NOKIA. I agree that sound quality is not like micromax but except sound quality micromax have nothing to offer u. Those who does't like this for 3G, just spend some extra bucks and u will get it. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Nakshi Posted on: 25 March 2011 fashionable and good connectivity overrall its a good phone for youngsters.its good for rough n tough use.it has much better connectivity. its worth for shellin out money.go for it..!!!! Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Naina Sharma Posted on: 15 February 2011 Nokia 5233 Its cheap and offers good performance to its price. Touch screen functions well. What i very much satisfied with this phone is its internet purpose, i and could not believe. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 92 people found this review helpful) see more+ By ANKIT Posted on: 12 February 2011 mast phone overall a good phone -compatible to the price, good looks-similar to Xpress music. no woofers though the video quality is better . i really appreciate this phone. I THINK IT SHOULD HAVE CAPACITIVE TOUCH INSTEAD OF RESISTIVE AS WE ARE GETTING IN SAMSUNG PHONES. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 50 out of 96 people found this review helpful)User All Reviews Write A Review see more+ By Sumit Posted on: 19 August 2012 Everything is conceptualized!! The phone gets good reception, the sound is good. the speaker phone works nice. It takes OK pictures, but it is very sensitive to motion and they come out blurry for me. The 16Gigabyte microSD is awesome. I can load all my MP3's on it, and listen for hours. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 2 out of 3 people found this review helpful) see more+ By SUPPORT NAAPTOL Posted on: 05 May 2012 AMIT NOKIA 5233 IS VERY GOOD MOBILE BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE FUNCTIONS AND GAMES AS COMPARED TO OTHERS OR MORE APPLICATIONS SUPPORTED BY THIS MOBILE.THERE ARE MORE Colour Options IN THIS MOBILE ..AND Nokia 5233 runs on Symbian S60v5 operating system and 434 MHz ARM processor. It comes with 2 megapixel camera and 3.2 inches TFT resistive touchscreen. it has 16GB expandable memory and supports GPRS/EGDE. Other feature includes a 3.5 mm audio jack, FM radio with RDS, A-GPS, audio and video player, Photo editor, Flash Lite 3.0, downloadable games, upto 7 hours talktime and OVI maps. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 17 out of 26 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Swapnil Sanagar Posted on: 27 April 2012 Nokia 5233 I have been using this model of Nokia since last 5 months and the touch screen of this handset is unbeatable. It has no comparison. Its gprs has good speed. the overall performance of this handset is awesome. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 11 out of 14 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Shyam Pandey Posted on: 19 April 2012 Nice Product I have updated my mobile software and got smily support. Excellent. Now I can send sms with emotions Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 52 people found this review helpful) see more+ By partha Posted on: 03 July 2011 NOKIA 5233 Very nice, durable and stylish phone and guess what its a NOKIA. I agree that sound quality is not like micromax but except sound quality micromax have nothing to offer u. Those who does't like this for 3G, just spend some extra bucks and u will get it. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Nakshi Posted on: 25 March 2011 fashionable and good connectivity overrall its a good phone for youngsters.its good for rough n tough use.it has much better connectivity. its worth for shellin out money.go for it..!!!! Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Naina Sharma Posted on: 15 February 2011 Nokia 5233 Its cheap and offers good performance to its price. Touch screen functions well. What i very much satisfied with this phone is its internet purpose, i and could not believe. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 92 people found this review helpful) see more+ By ANKIT Posted on: 12 February 2011 mast phone overall a good phone -compatible to the price, good looks-similar to Xpress music. no woofers though the video quality is better . i really appreciate this phone. I THINK IT SHOULD HAVE CAPACITIVE TOUCH INSTEAD OF RESISTIVE AS WE ARE GETTING IN SAMSUNG PHONES. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 50 out of 96 people found this review helpful)User All Reviews Write A Review see more+ By Sumit Posted on: 19 August 2012 Everything is conceptualized!! The phone gets good reception, the sound is good. the speaker phone works nice. It takes OK pictures, but it is very sensitive to motion and they come out blurry for me. The 16Gigabyte microSD is awesome. I can load all my MP3's on it, and listen for hours. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 2 out of 3 people found this review helpful) see more+ By SUPPORT NAAPTOL Posted on: 05 May 2012 AMIT NOKIA 5233 IS VERY GOOD MOBILE BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE FUNCTIONS AND GAMES AS COMPARED TO OTHERS OR MORE APPLICATIONS SUPPORTED BY THIS MOBILE.THERE ARE MORE Colour Options IN THIS MOBILE ..AND Nokia 5233 runs on Symbian S60v5 operating system and 434 MHz ARM processor. It comes with 2 megapixel camera and 3.2 inches TFT resistive touchscreen. it has 16GB expandable memory and supports GPRS/EGDE. Other feature includes a 3.5 mm audio jack, FM radio with RDS, A-GPS, audio and video player, Photo editor, Flash Lite 3.0, downloadable games, upto 7 hours talktime and OVI maps. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 17 out of 26 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Swapnil Sanagar Posted on: 27 April 2012 Nokia 5233 I have been using this model of Nokia since last 5 months and the touch screen of this handset is unbeatable. It has no comparison. Its gprs has good speed. the overall performance of this handset is awesome. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 11 out of 14 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Shyam Pandey Posted on: 19 April 2012 Nice Product I have updated my mobile software and got smily support. Excellent. Now I can send sms with emotions Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 52 people found this review helpful) see more+ By partha Posted on: 03 July 2011 NOKIA 5233 Very nice, durable and stylish phone and guess what its a NOKIA. I agree that sound quality is not like micromax but except sound quality micromax have nothing to offer u. Those who does't like this for 3G, just spend some extra bucks and u will get it. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Nakshi Posted on: 25 March 2011 fashionable and good connectivity overrall its a good phone for youngsters.its good for rough n tough use.it has much better connectivity. its worth for shellin out money.go for it..!!!! Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Naina Sharma Posted on: 15 February 2011 Nokia 5233 Its cheap and offers good performance to its price. Touch screen functions well. What i very much satisfied with this phone is its internet purpose, i and could not believe. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 92 people found this review helpful) see more+ By ANKIT Posted on: 12 February 2011 mast phone overall a good phone -compatible to the price, good looks-similar to Xpress music. no woofers though the video quality is better . i really appreciate this phone. I THINK IT SHOULD HAVE CAPACITIVE TOUCH INSTEAD OF RESISTIVE AS WE ARE GETTING IN SAMSUNG PHONES. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 50 out of 96 people found this review helpful)User All Reviews Write A Review see more+ By Sumit Posted on: 19 August 2012 Everything is conceptualized!! The phone gets good reception, the sound is good. the speaker phone works nice. It takes OK pictures, but it is very sensitive to motion and they come out blurry for me. The 16Gigabyte microSD is awesome. I can load all my MP3's on it, and listen for hours. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 2 out of 3 people found this review helpful) see more+ By SUPPORT NAAPTOL Posted on: 05 May 2012 AMIT NOKIA 5233 IS VERY GOOD MOBILE BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE FUNCTIONS AND GAMES AS COMPARED TO OTHERS OR MORE APPLICATIONS SUPPORTED BY THIS MOBILE.THERE ARE MORE Colour Options IN THIS MOBILE ..AND Nokia 5233 runs on Symbian S60v5 operating system and 434 MHz ARM processor. It comes with 2 megapixel camera and 3.2 inches TFT resistive touchscreen. it has 16GB expandable memory and supports GPRS/EGDE. Other feature includes a 3.5 mm audio jack, FM radio with RDS, A-GPS, audio and video player, Photo editor, Flash Lite 3.0, downloadable games, upto 7 hours talktime and OVI maps. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 17 out of 26 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Swapnil Sanagar Posted on: 27 April 2012 Nokia 5233 I have been using this model of Nokia since last 5 months and the touch screen of this handset is unbeatable. It has no comparison. Its gprs has good speed. the overall performance of this handset is awesome. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 11 out of 14 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Shyam Pandey Posted on: 19 April 2012 Nice Product I have updated my mobile software and got smily support. Excellent. Now I can send sms with emotions Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 52 people found this review helpful) see more+ By partha Posted on: 03 July 2011 NOKIA 5233 Very nice, durable and stylish phone and guess what its a NOKIA. I agree that sound quality is not like micromax but except sound quality micromax have nothing to offer u. Those who does't like this for 3G, just spend some extra bucks and u will get it. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Nakshi Posted on: 25 March 2011 fashionable and good connectivity overrall its a good phone for youngsters.its good for rough n tough use.it has much better connectivity. its worth for shellin out money.go for it..!!!! Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Naina Sharma Posted on: 15 February 2011 Nokia 5233 Its cheap and offers good performance to its price. Touch screen functions well. What i very much satisfied with this phone is its internet purpose, i and could not believe. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 92 people found this review helpful) see more+ By ANKIT Posted on: 12 February 2011 mast phone overall a good phone -compatible to the price, good looks-similar to Xpress music. no woofers though the video quality is better . i really appreciate this phone. I THINK IT SHOULD HAVE CAPACITIVE TOUCH INSTEAD OF RESISTIVE AS WE ARE GETTING IN SAMSUNG PHONES. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 50 out of 96 people found this review helpful)User All Reviews Write A Review see more+ By Sumit Posted on: 19 August 2012 Everything is conceptualized!! The phone gets good reception, the sound is good. the speaker phone works nice. It takes OK pictures, but it is very sensitive to motion and they come out blurry for me. The 16Gigabyte microSD is awesome. I can load all my MP3's on it, and listen for hours. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 2 out of 3 people found this review helpful) see more+ By SUPPORT NAAPTOL Posted on: 05 May 2012 AMIT NOKIA 5233 IS VERY GOOD MOBILE BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE FUNCTIONS AND GAMES AS COMPARED TO OTHERS OR MORE APPLICATIONS SUPPORTED BY THIS MOBILE.THERE ARE MORE Colour Options IN THIS MOBILE ..AND Nokia 5233 runs on Symbian S60v5 operating system and 434 MHz ARM processor. It comes with 2 megapixel camera and 3.2 inches TFT resistive touchscreen. it has 16GB expandable memory and supports GPRS/EGDE. Other feature includes a 3.5 mm audio jack, FM radio with RDS, A-GPS, audio and video player, Photo editor, Flash Lite 3.0, downloadable games, upto 7 hours talktime and OVI maps. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 17 out of 26 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Swapnil Sanagar Posted on: 27 April 2012 Nokia 5233 I have been using this model of Nokia since last 5 months and the touch screen of this handset is unbeatable. It has no comparison. Its gprs has good speed. the overall performance of this handset is awesome. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 11 out of 14 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Shyam Pandey Posted on: 19 April 2012 Nice Product I have updated my mobile software and got smily support. Excellent. Now I can send sms with emotions Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 52 people found this review helpful) see more+ By partha Posted on: 03 July 2011 NOKIA 5233 Very nice, durable and stylish phone and guess what its a NOKIA. I agree that sound quality is not like micromax but except sound quality micromax have nothing to offer u. Those who does't like this for 3G, just spend some extra bucks and u will get it. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 48 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Nakshi Posted on: 25 March 2011 fashionable and good connectivity overrall its a good phone for youngsters.its good for rough n tough use.it has much better connectivity. its worth for shellin out money.go for it..!!!! Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 93 people found this review helpful) see more+ By Naina Sharma Posted on: 15 February 2011 Nokia 5233 Its cheap and offers good performance to its price. Touch screen functions well. What i very much satisfied with this phone is its internet purpose, i and could not believe. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 47 out of 92 people found this review helpful) see more+ By ANKIT Posted on: 12 February 2011 mast phone overall a good phone -compatible to the price, good looks-similar to Xpress music. no woofers though the video quality is better . i really appreciate this phone. I THINK IT SHOULD HAVE CAPACITIVE TOUCH INSTEAD OF RESISTIVE AS WE ARE GETTING IN SAMSUNG PHONES. Report Abuse | Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No ( 50 out of 96 people found this review helpful)
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your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating 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criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.We've calculated your overall product rating based on the average of your criteria ratings above.
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nokia 5288
Also known as Nokia 5228 General 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 SIM Mini-SIM Announced 2010, January Status Available. Released 2010, January Body Dimensions 111 x 51.7 x 14.5 mm, 83 cc (4.37 x 2.04 x 0.57 in) Weight 113 g (3.99 oz) Display Type TFT resistive touchscreen, 16M colors Size 360 x 640 pixels, 3.2 inches (~229 ppi pixel density) - Handwriting recognition Sound Alert types Vibration, MP3 ringtones Loudspeaker Yes 3.5mm jack Yes Memory Card slot microSD, up to 16 GB Internal 70 MB storage, 128 MB RAM Data GPRS Class 32 EDGE Class 32 WLAN No Bluetooth Yes, v2.0 with A2DP USB Yes, microUSB v2.0 Camera Primary 2 MP, 1600x1200 pixels Video Yes, 640x360@30 fps Secondary No Features OS Symbian OS v9.4, Series 60 rel. 5 CPU 434 MHz ARM 11 Sensors Accelerometer, proximity Messaging SMS, MMS, Email, IM Browser WAP 2.0/xHTML, HTML, Adobe Flash Lite Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS GPS No Java Yes, MIDP 2.1 Colors Black, White; various back covers - Comes with music on select markets - MP4/H.264/H.263/WMV player - MP3/WAV/eAAC+/WMA player - Organizer - Photo editor - Voice memo/dial - Predictive text input Battery Li-Ion 1320 mAh battery (BL-5J) Stand-by Up to 432 h Talk time Up to 7 h Music play Up to 33 h Misc SAR EU 1.10 W/kg (head) Price group [About 120 EUR] Nokia 5233 wholesale price history provided by cellpex Nokia phones Nokia Lumia 920 Nokia Lumia 620 Nokia Lumia 820 Nokia Asha 311 Nokia Lumia 610 Nokia N9 Nokia Lumia 800 Nokia N8 Nokia Lumia 510 Nokia 808 PureView Nokia Lumia 710 Nokia 206 Nokia Asha 305 Nokia Lumia 505 Nokia Asha 302 Nokia 500 Nokia C3 Nokia C5 Nokia Asha 308 Nokia E5 more phones Nokia Samsung Motorola Sony Ericsson Sony LG Apple HTC BlackBerry HP Huawei Acer Asus Dell Alcatel Vodafone T-Mobile Toshiba Gigabyte Pantech ZTE Micromax BLU Spice © 2000-2013 GSMArena.com Mobile version Contact us Advertising Privacy Terms of use CDN by nokia 5288 is an osam phone the product verification is provided as above all using this phone will provide you a fabulous experiance and u will love to work with this phone it has several advantages like Keep up to date & share your views: Moby1 Archive iPhone 5 deals Galaxy SIII deals « How Samsung Galaxy 3 (I5800) Impresses More about the White Galaxy S and Nokia N8 Launch » The Nokia 5288: Offering a Cheaper Alternative Just For You digg Delicious Save Nokia 5228 2Nokia has released the cheaper version of the Nokia 5230 and it is called Nokia 5288. If there is one thing to commend about Nokia, it is their capability to provide a new mobile model based on their previous release while altering some features to better fit a certain consumer class. For some, that concept might be a bit confusing but definitely not for Nokia as they are able to capture a broader market with this technique. It gives the consumer an option of choosing which mobile would fit them best depending on the available budget. After all, not all consumers are willing to pay that much to get the convenience of having a Smartphone. It may also be a concept that Nokia uses to gain consumers from different geographical markets. The perfect example is still the Nokia 5230 which was made for T-Mobile USA and served as an inspiration to the Nokia 5233 which targeted the Asian segment. The release of the Nokia 5228 aims to give the European segment a cheaper alternative in the hope that other markets would also embrace this wonderful option provided to them. This mobile costs only around £100 which is a pretty impressive price compared to the other Smartphones available in the market today. You can also check to see what Nokia 5288 deals are currently being offered. Bunch of Features The Nokia 5288 has a resistive touch screen display just like most of the Smartphones offered by Nokia. For those who are uncertain of what a resistive touch screen can do and what advantages it holds then here it goes. Resistive touch screen technology gives you the benefit of using your stylus, therefore letting you maximise this added feature instead of just settling for finger-tapping. Though getting used to using a stylus for writing a text message usually takes some time, after overcoming this initial stage you would realize that it actually has its fair share of benefits. Interesting right? You might even eventually find yourself using your stylus to type a text instead of using the QWERTY keypad. Nokia 5228The screen of the Nokia 5288 is quite admirable at 3.2 inches and is sure to provide you with good quality images with its capability to display up to 16 million colours. The accelerometer plays an important role in a good Smartphone experience because of its auto-rotate feature. When you are on a call, the proximity censor does it job by cancelling the touch feature of the screen so that the call won’t be cancelled once your face makes contact with the display. It has an internal memory of 70MB, but with the help of a MicroSD card it can be expanded up to 16GB. That type of memory space is already enough for you to keep almost everything you’ve downloaded or to keep as much photos and videos as you wish. One of the not so good side of the 5288 is that it only has a 2MP camera. Nonetheless, it still serves its purpose of capturing candid moments just when you need it. Looking at the brighter side, compared to the Nokia 5230 which can only capture VGA videos, this mobile can surprisingly capture nHD video with a resolution of 640 x 360 pixels. This is definitely an advantage for users who enjoy capturing videos more than snapping photos on their mobiles. Battery life is also one of the assets of this mobile. For those who use their device a lot to listen to music, the Nokia 5288 can play songs for as long as 33 hrs. The stand by time is 18 days and a total of 67 hrs talk time. It is fit for those who can’t afford to find time to charge their mobile often. A Symbian S60 Device Nokia 5228 4Symbian has offered its service to mobile users for a long period of time now and many prefer to use this reliable OS. Luckily, Nokia has chosen Symbian S60 as the operating system for the Nokia 5288. This operating system has opened an endless number of applications to choose from may it be games, office applications or communication programs. Thanks to technology, social networking sites has made it easier for us to stay connected to our family and friends. This OS lets you access your favourite social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The 5288 will definitely keep you updated all the time. Some might criticise Nokia for sticking with a mobile OS that has received its fair share of critics through the years. However, with the vast improvements on this enhanced version, it may just be the case of patience paying dividends for the Finnish mobile manufacturer. Connectivity One very important feature of a mobile that consumers take a look at first is its capability to access the internet as well as its speed. It is undeniable to say that internet has become part of our daily lives and some feel that something is missing when they are unable to check their social networking accounts such Facaebook and Twitter on a daily basis. Nokia 5228 3Nokia continues to satisfy the demands of its ever-changing consumers and still offers web accessibility in the Nokia 5288. We are all aware that the 5288 is the cheaper version of its older brother, the Nokia 5230. However it clearly shows that Nokia needed to cut down on some of its features to level with its affordable price. In terms of data communication it does not support HSDPA or 3G but it is compatible with EDGE and GPRS. Nonetheless it is still perfect for casual web browsing. For those who don’t stay online for hours, the connectivity of this mobile is still okay. Though the connectivity features of this mobile is not top of the line, it is still fair to say that Nokia still did a good job in providing a quality handset with a cheaper price though the release of the Nokia 5288. Aside from connectivity this mobile still has a lot to offer which definitely makes it as a good buy. Read more Nokia 5288 reviews on the reviews page. Tags: Nokia, Nokia-5288 This entry was posted on Saturday, July 31st, 2010 at 9:19 am and is filed under Nokia Phones. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
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Product Details
GENERAL FEATURE SET
Package
Handset, Battery, Charger, Headset, Data Cable, Stylus, User Manual
Form
Bar
SIM
Single SIM, GSM
Touch Screen
Yes, Resistive
Call Related Features
Conference Call, Speed Dialing, Loudspeaker, Call Timer, Call Divert
DISPLAY
Type
TFT resistive touchscreen
Size
3.2 Inches
Resolution
640 x 360 Pixels
Colors
16 M
CAMERA
Primary Camera
Yes, 2 Megapixel
Secondary Camera
No
DIMENSIONS
Size
51.7 x 111 x 14.5 mm
Weight
113 g
BATTERY
Type
Li-Ion, 1320 mAh
Talktime
7 hrs (2G)
Standby Time
438 hrs (2G)
MEMORY AND STORAGE
Internal
50 MB
Memory Card
MicroSD
Extensible Memory
Upto 16 GB
DATA
Internet Features
Email
Preinstalled Browser
WAP 2.0
USB connectivity
Yes, micro USB, v2
Bluetooth
Yes, v2, Supported Profiles
Audio Jack
3.5 mm
MULTIMEDIA
Music Player
Yes, Supports MP3, eAAC+, WAV
Video Player
Yes, Supports MP4, H.264, H.263, 3GP, WMV
FM Player
Yes
Ringtone
MP3
OTHER FEATURES
Call Memory
Yes
SMS Memory
Yes
More Features
Flight and Offline Mode, Calendar, Converter, Reminders, Calculator, To-do List, Alarm Clock, Digital Clock, Analogue Clock, MMS Enabled, Audio Equalizer, Audio and Video Streaming
WARRANTY
Warranty Period
1 year manufacturer warranty for Phone and 6 months warranty for in the box accessories
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